What is a Thinking Partner?

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The Role of a Thinking Partner

Susan Bradley, CFP® CFT™ Founder of Sudden Money Institute

Bloukrans River BridgeTransitions take time; based on experts in the field and our advisors’ experiences, they can take from five to seven years to   complete. One of the key roles of a Thinking Partner during transitions is to help clients find their own answers. Without training, process and tools, the idea of weighing through layers of possibilities and uncertainty one by one, over whatever time-frame the client needs, may seem daunting. However, when an advisor comes to the client with tools to aid in the sorting and discovery process, the experience may be profoundly rewarding for planners and their clients.

 The Thinking Partner role changes from a nice “value-add” experience for a status-quo client, to an “essential need” experience for a client in a major life transition.

Thinking Partners are trained to

  • Get on the balcony and see the big picture
  • Normalize uncertainty and allow discovery
  • Lower stress levels to increase attention span and decision-making capacity
  • Support unpredictable timelines and results

It is common to underestimate the value of being skilled and trained as a Thinking Partner; that is until you notice your clients struggling in spite of your good financial advice or when you are in the transition experience yourself. The closer you get to the transition experience, the easier it is to see the big, sometimes giant, missing piece in traditional financial planning, practice of law and in life coaching.

The good news is the gap between being an expert in your profession and being a Thinking Partner for your clients is easier to fill than you might expect and the rewards are greater than you can imagine. We believe that now more than ever, Transition Expertise Matters.

Join me next week for more on the skills of a Thinking Partner.

To Learn More about Transitions Expertise:

 Join Us for our Virtual CFT™ Training beginning July 10

  Click Here for More Information and to Register

Three Questions For Successful Adaptation

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Three Questions For Successful Adaptation
The Art of Managing Life Transitions

Susan Bradley, CFP® CFT™ Founder of Sudden Money Institute

monarch-butterfly

Common experiences for anyone in a life transition is a break in the normal patterns of life; a disruption of routine, change in finances, an emotional upheaval. One might think that once the money aspects are settled; the primary job of the financial planner is finished. However, just because the money is settled, does not mean that the transition is completed. Typically it takes a few years to adapt to a new stage in life.  During this Passage Stage of a transition, there is a natural sorting process taking place.

There are three recurring questions to be considered:

  •  What needs to be let go of? 
  • What is important: what needs to be protected and held onto? 
  • What needs to be created? 

Uncertainty usually accompanies this sorting process. Not having concrete or consistent answers may be uncomfortable and there is a temptation to ‘just make a decision‘.  You won’t find the answers in calculations, spreadsheets or psychological evaluations. Although these may be helpful they are not the source of the solutions and new direction.  When working with clients in transition, the job of the financial planner frequently moves away from being an expert and towards that of a client’s thinking partner.

Though the roles may seem to be one and the same, they are distinctly different and equally important.

More on the distinctions and why they matter next week.

Beyond the First Year

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A short blog of helpful tips when speaking to widows
Excerpts taken from Impactful Empathy by Kathleen Rehl, Ph.D. CFP®,
Author of Moving Forward on Your Own: A Financial Guidebook for Widows
and Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member

bridge transition

Advisors receive advice about what to do for widow clients during the first year, but what happens after? SMI Faculty Member Kathleen Rehl Ph.D. shares on the topic.

Beyond the First Year

While your client may have moved on to the next stage of widowhood by this time-GROWTH-it’s important to recognize that although her grief is no longer raw, she’s probably still grieving. Many widows will continue transitioning into a new life after the first year, as they move toward becoming more than just a widow. This third stage of widowhood is a time of TRANSFORMATION. The future may even hold the possibility of new relationships. Your continued support and attention is important as she prepares to make decisions about her changed life ahead.“Look how far you’ve come over the past year after (name)’s death. This may be the hardest thing you’ve ever done. I know your grief process is not over, but you are making wonderful progress.” You’ve moved through this year with grace and beauty, and I believe (name) would be so proud of you for continuing to move forward with your life. And I’m proud of you, too!”


To Learn More about Working with Widow Clients: 

Join Kathleen Rehl and Susan Bradley for SMI’s first ever Virtual CFT™ Training Workshop  

Click Here for Information and to Register 

Questions That Matter: Part Three

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Dr. Moira Somers, Ph.D., C. Psych.

Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member

Questions That Matter:  Part One
Questions That Matter:  Part Two

Anticipate Non-Adherence

The effective advisor understands that many change attempts fail because of a lack of realistic planning. Instead of just hoping for the best, spend some time anticipating setbacks and figuring out how to ease the load. timeout

Try the following questions:

  • Is there anybody in your life who might be upset by this course of action?
  • What is going to be hardest for you to do or stop doing?
  • What would lead you to give up?
  • How could we set it up so that things happen as automatically as possible, with a minimum of disruption or demand on you?

Dr. Moira Somers, Ph.D., C. Psych. is a Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member and financial psychologist. Learn more about her work at Money, Mind and Meaning.

Questions That Matter: Part Two

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Dr. Moira Somers, Ph.D., C. Psych.
Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member
Questions That Matter:  Part One

 Assess Readiness for Change

Ever get the sense that YOU are motivated more than your client? That’s a common experience among advice-givers.advisor team

While your enthusiasm and persuasive skills can temporarily boost the spirits of a discouraged client, that’s usually insufficient to lead to lasting change. Lasting change comes when people resolve their own ambivalence by coming up with their own powerful reasons for doing things differently.

Try the following questions to help them get there:

  • What are your reasons for wanting to make these changes?
  • Can you think of any reasons for not changing?
  • Do you feel ready to take action on this right now?
  • How confident are you that this solution meets your needs?

If the answers to these questions fail to give you an unambiguous Green Light, then do not pass Go!  Instead, spend time exploring alternatives. Put your efforts into things that the client IS ready to take on.

Dr. Moira Somers, Ph.D., C. Psych. is a Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member and financial psychologist. Learn more about her work at Money, Mind and Meaning.

Questions That Matter: Part One

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Questions That Matter:  Part One

Dr. Moira Somers, Ph.D., C. Psych.
Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member

 Help Ensure Mutual Comprehension

 There are many reasons why clients may not follow excellent advice. One of the most common reasons is that they did not fully understand what was said to them by their advisor.

In order to avoid this problem, add the following questions to each of your client meetings:

hands question cropped

  • Is there anything we haven’t had a chance to talk about today that you really wanted us to discuss?  Do you feel that I have a good understanding of the situation?
  • Do you have any more questions for me?
  • Can you tell me in your own words what we agreed would be the next step, and why?
  • Is there anything that is leaving you unsettled or unsure?

 

Dr. Moira Somers, Ph.D., C. Psych. is a Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member and financial psychologist. Learn more about her work at Money, Mind and Meaning.

Habits of Healthy Family Cultures : Part Three

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Part Three

Ten Habits of Healthy Family Cultures
Exerpts taken from Intentional Wealth by Courtney Pullen, M.A., LPC
Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member

We hope you’ve enjoyed Part One and Part Two of our series, Ten Habits of Healthy Family Cultures.  Author and SMI faculty member Courtney Pullen has shared some intentional practices, beliefs and behaviors that can lead to successful family cultures.  Here are some more of those habits he observed in his book Intentional Wealth.happy asian family

See the family as a learning system.

Families who are most successful at passing their values on to future generations understand the importance of seeing mistakes as something to learn from.  They are willing to learn from advisors and confident enough to seek out those who are willing to “speak truth to power.”  They cultivate a sense of appropriate humility.

See the family as a steward of the wealth.

 Most of the legacy families that I have worked with or interviewed discuss openly the family’s responsibility to be the steward of the wealth.  There is a deep sense that “to whom much is given, much is expected.”  They describe themselves as the custodians of their wealth and of the well-being of others. I have worked with a number of families who had very different political or social beliefs from each other, but they were in alignment around the value of making a contribution in the lives of others.

 

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Habits of Healthy Family Cultures : Part Two

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Part Two

Ten Habits of Healthy Family Cultures
Exerpts taken from Intentional Wealth by Courtney Pullen, M.A., LPC
Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member

Last week, in Volume One of Ten Habits of Healthy Family Cultures, author and SMI faculty member Courtney Pullen shared some intentional practices, beliefs and behaviors that lead to successful family cultures.  Here are some more of those habits he observed in his book Intentional Wealth.Bradley grandparents

Support family members in leading lives with purpose.

 One of the greatest fears for many wealth creators is that their success will enable future generations to become dependent and live off the family money without becoming contributing members of society.  Successful legacy families are very intentional in supporting each member of the family to live a life with purpose and meaning. The family isn’t threatened by differences in personality, thought or temperament.  Instead, it values the differences and sees them as contributing to the strength of the family.

 

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Habits of Healthy Family Cultures : Part One

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Part One

Ten Habits of Healthy Family Cultures
Exerpts taken from Intentional Wealth by Courtney Pullen, M.A., LPC
Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member

Families who base their wealth management on a foundation of integrity and a sense of gratuity are the most likely to flourish.  Author and SMI faculty member Courtney Pullen shares some intentional practices, beliefs and behaviors that lead to successful family cultures from his book, Intentional Wealth

trees in forest small

Establish shared family values.

In successful families, founding generations do more than expect younger members to live up to the family values.  They find ways to consciously teach those values as well as modeling them in their own behavior.  Families who flourish also understand that there are many ways to demonstrate values such as stewardship, hard work, and excellence.  Such families are secure and flexible enough to accommodate varying lifestyles and behaviors because they focus on the values that underlie those surface appearances.  

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What to Say and When to Say It: Part Three

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Part Three

A Three-Part Series of helpful tips when speaking to widows
Excerpts taken from Impactful Empathy by Kathleen Rehl, Ph.D. CFP®,
author of Moving Forward on Your Own: A Financial Guidebook for Widows and Sudden Money® Institute Faculty Member

We hope you have enjoyed reading Part One and Part Two of the What to Say and When to Say It series.  Here are some final things to avoid saying when you speak with a widow:

mature woman on computer

You’re young. You’ll find someone new. You can remarry.

The pain of losing a spouse is immeasurable, and the prospect of sharing that intimacy with a new person can be upsetting, frightening or painful.  Talking about future relationships is not a good approach, and while some may think it could cheer up a grieving widow, this is likely to have the opposite effect. 

Instead, focus on the important friendships the widow has in her life.  Her current network provides the solid, uncomplicated support she needs. “You are so fortunate to have many good friends. Their support will help you through this difficult time. Take them up on their offers to help or get together for lunch or coffee.  They really are there for you, like you would be for them.”

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